Exercise & Study: Brain Gains

As the weeks go by and the deadlines begin to build up, keeping fit and healthy can often times be a pain. Do students really want to go for a jog when they have 3 essays due? By the time you finish a long hard day in college or a full day of study in the stuffy library, you’ll struggle to find a willing student to grace the gym for an hour or head out for a walk.

It’s usually study or exercise, very rarely both. But both are extremely important and usually work best when they are combined. Finding that balance isn’t always easy and it obviously depends on the student and their circumstances, but why should students consider hitting the gym after a full day of study as opposed to stretching out on the couch and watching TV?

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Exercise can boost your brain power. Experiments conducted on mice at the University of Illinois found that mice that ran on a wheel often had more neurons (brain cells) than the mice that did not. Scientists have discovered that exercise appears to build a brain that resists physical shrinking and enhance cognitive function. Frequent exercise has also been linked to an increase in memory.

Exercise can help with your concentration also. Studies with ADHD children that did 20 minutes of cardio, such as running or cycling before their classes found that they improved their concentration, class participation and behavior.

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American Heart Foundation

To start reaping these benefits of exercise you don’t have to be in the gym for 3 hours, seven days a week. Many studies suggest that 30 minutes of exercise 3 days week can be enough. With loads of sporting societies on campus you are spoiled for choice as to how you want to get your exercise in and it doesn’t even have to be a sport, you could go for a run or a walk which is completely free and just as rewarding!

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